Ravenna-Bryant Annual Meeting and other Community Councils

Posted by | March 15, 2018 | 1 Meeting to Connect | No Comments

No matter which neighborhood you call home in Northeast Seattle, there is a Community Council of active volunteers who track important local issues, lead frequent meetings to inform the public, and raise concerns to government officials.

The community council covering one of the largest geographic areas in Northeast Seattle is the Ravenna-Bryant Community Association (RBCA).

To learn about RBCA’s key accomplishments for the neighborhoods in 2017, CLICK HERE. Most recently, the RBCA has been advocating for traffic-calming, pedestrian safety measures on Northeast 65th Street.

This season’s “Meeting to Connect” is the annual gathering of the RAVENNA-BRYANT COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION.

  • WHAT: general membership annual meeting of the Ravenna-Bryant Community Association (you don’t need to be a member to attend)
  • WHEN: Monday, April 2, 2018 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
  • WHERE: Ravenna-Eckstein Community Center at 6535 Ravenna Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98115
  • WHO: you, your neighbors, and city officials — including the Assistant Chief of the Seattle Police Department (SPD)
  • WHY: because you love where you live

Board members of RBCA (and most community councils) meet monthly and bring a diversity of views on how to be good stewards for the neighborhoods. The current chair is Inga Manskopf, with previous chairs including Sarah Swanberg and former candidate for City Council Tony Provine. Add your voice to the mix.

The Special Guest will be Assistant Chief of Seattle Police Department Steve Wilske. As we know, Northeast Seattle has suffered its share of significant crime incidents, including the recent home invasion and shooting in Bryant, scary school lock-downs, frequent bank robberies (such as Key Bank in Wedgwood), and the horrific multiple shooting at Cafe Racer.

The Assistant Chief can answer your questions and will likely advise us to call 9-1-1 for nearly every public safety concern, even if it’s not an emergency because it enables SPD to use those statistics to deploy resources, such as police patrols.

Crime Prevention Coordinator: If you would like to talk to someone at SPD about crime prevention techniques, ongoing crime problems in your neighborhood, getting involved in Block Watch, and setting up a meeting to train you and your neighbors on crime prevention tips, contact Mary.Amberg@seattle.gov or call her at 206-684-7711.

One of the best ways to get involved in your neighborhood is to attend the community council in your neighborhood and subscribe to their newsletters. Click on the links below to see their next monthly meeting:

To subscribe to RBCA’s e-newsletter, CLICK HERE. The Ravenna Blog seems to be most active on Twitter, which you can access by CLICKING HERE.

MORE “MEETINGS TO CONNECT” (from the sample of Northeast Seattle community groups listed above):

  • WHAT: University Park Community Club (UPCC) shares information about “Mobility” around the incoming Sound Transit light rail station at Brooklyn Ave NE in the heart of the U District.
  • WHEN: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 at 7:00 p.m.
  • WHERE: University Lutheran Church at 16th Ave NE and NE 50th St Seattle, WA 98108
  • WHO: you and your neighbors and local transportation experts
  • WHY: because you want to learn more about the light rail station that opens in 2021. Will there be a way to drive there and drop off your family members?

Community Councils of connected neighborhoods used to join together to collaborate and share information at a district level, forming 13 District Councils across Seattle. Disappointingly, Former Ed Murray abandoned the all-volunteer District Councils. Some believe he did this because many of those groups were opposing the centerpiece of his H.A.L.A. recommendations: the top-down, back-room deal to grant citywide upzones to real estate developers in exchange for funding some affordable housing in the future. The irony is that the volunteers still meet in neighborhoods throughout the City, while the former Mayor was abandoned.

Neighborhoods endure. But it takes neighbors like you to keep them going. Connect!

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